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VIDEO: RV Boondocking & Water

April 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminHere’s another episode of “The Loloho Show,” our ongoing chat series that broadcasts to our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH). In this episode, we talk about boondocking and water management. Anyone who RV camps eventually does some boondocking. And why not? Camping without hookups is arguably the most rewarding aspect of RV ownership. Sure, we all enjoy taking a long hot shower in a full hookup campground. But some of our fondest camping memories have been made off the beaten path. In the video we mention several products that have helped us stretch out our water supply. These include: RV WATER FILTER (http://goo.gl/Qlwy2m) The 2-pack is by far the best deal. JERRYCAN FOR WATER (http://goo.gl/g1u4Ok) DRY SHAMPOO (http://goo.gl/2OxQS0) OXYGENICS SHOWER HEAD (http://goo.gl/Q57ekh) BRITTA BELLA WATER PITCHER (http://goo.gl/bJRKrJ) THE NEXT EXIT – INTERSTATE HIGHWAY EXIT DIRECTORY (http://goo.gl/bdUsGy) And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more fun free videos.  Read More →



REVIEW: Chamberlain’s Leather Milk

April 15, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Today we’re taking a look at Chamberlain’s Leather Milk (http://goo.gl/2neqnh), a unique leather cleaning and conditioning product that’s a perennial bestseller. If you have leather seats or other leather products in your RV, it’s worth a look. This Chamberlain’s product is touted as “Leather Care Liniment No. 1.” It’s interesting that the company is labeling this product a liniment, since that sounds like something with medicinal value. Is this a magic leather elixir? Indeed, Chamberlain’s Leather Milk promises to do it all. It’s a combination of natural conditioners plus a gentle cleaner. So unlike Lexol, which offers separate cleaning and conditioning products, with Chamberlain’s you can let one product do the work. The gentle nature of the cleaning means the “milk” may be used as often as desired to clean and refresh leather items. It also means that for extra heavy cleaning jobs, you’ll likely want a more robust cleaner. My personal interest is in keeping our tow vehicle SEEMORE’s leather seats well conditioned and looking their best. But Chamberlain’s claims to be effective on all sorts of leather products, including bags, luggage, purses, shoes, boots, saddle/tack, and leather apparel. Just don’t use it on soft leather and suede and you should be fine. Chamberlain’s includes a special applicator pad to ensure you get the best results from the conditioner. The first thing you may notice... Read more



REVIEW: “Cut Resistant” Kevlar Gloves

April 14, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

I keep lots of gloves in our RV – so many that my wife thinks I have a glove hoarding problem and/or fetish. But each pair really does serve a unique purpose. An example is these G&F Kevlar Cut Resistant Gloves (http://goo.gl/SKBvMY) which are designed to protect hands from cuts and abrasions. These gloves are made of cut resistant Kevlar. (Click the pic for more info.) At first glance, these gloves looks like ordinary cotton gardening gloves. But closer inspection reveals that they are made of cut resistant Kevlar. Note that they are cut resistant, not cut proof. If you really wanted to cut these gloves with a sharp knife, you could probably do so. But it would take some effort. Kevlar offers protection from the sort of small cuts that may happen when handling tools like knives and other blades. Some people use these gloves while working with wood. Others like to wear these gloves in the kitchen when using dangerous tools like a Japanese mandolin. If you want your Kevlar gloves to last, use them for cutting tasks ONLY. Use different gloves for work. (Click the pic for more info.) The goal here is to protect one’s hands from sharp edges of metals, ceramics, glass, and other materials. These particular gloves are studded with PVC dots on both sides that provide excellent grip. Note that over time the PVC dots can get damaged as you handle heavy objects. I have worn these Kevlar gloves while working with a chainsaw and handling wood. I have no illusions that these... Read more



“Zzz” Better with Memory Foam

April 8, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

One of our all-time favorite RV upgrades is our memory foam mattress topper (http://goo.gl/6qy80E). It transformed our lousy RV mattress into a comfy place to sleep. But if we were shopping today, we might replace the entire mattress with a memory foam RV mattress (http://goo.gl/eSWOC8). For a little more than a mere topper, now you can outfit your rig with a complete mattress. With the RV camping season upon us, this may be the best upgrade you can make. Memory foam is the key to sleep in an RV! (Click the pic for more info.) We spend about one-third of our lives asleep. It’s tough to enjoy a day if you didn’t get quality sleep the night before. Yet most RVs are equipped with thin mattresses that provide minimal back support. In fact, the average RV mattress is scarcely more supportive than a pile of dead leaves. Our Airstream mattress, which is simply an average off-the-rack RV mattress, rests on a hard slab of plywood. It’s kind of like sleeping on a lumpy piece of wood. What do you get when you place a thin lousy mattress on top of a hard surface? You get a backache, that’s what you get. You also get grumpy. You get into arguments. Eventually, you get a divorce. Don’t get a divorce. Get memory foam. Lay a mattress topper on top of an ordinary RV mattress for a vast improvement in sleep! (Click the pic for more info.) What is memory foam? It’s another modern material that’s improving our lives. It’s soft yet firm, offering both... Read more



Bend, Oregon based Host RV introduces off-road expedition vehicle

March 28, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

Bend, Oregon based Host RV introduces off-road expedition vehicle I admit, I’m starry-eyed whenever I come across an expedition or off-road RV, one that will let me explore rough terrain like a super-sized Jeep. And Host’s Outback Explorer has my boondocker’s pulse racing. But Randall Pozzi, national sales manager for the Bend, Ore.-based manufacturer of campers, expedition vehicles and Class C motorhomes, said the products will stand out in the marketplace – especially when it comes to the Aspen. The Outback is all about going places off the beaten path, coming with either three slide-outs and a side entry or two slide-outs with a rear entry. It is built on a Mitsubishi Fuso Canter 4X4 chassis and features a six-speed duonic automatic transmission. “It’s for the people who want to go places you can’t go with your normal RV,” says Randall Pozzi, national sales manager of Host. “It has the ability to cross creeks and go out in the sand. When you’re driving down the highway and you see that dirt road that goes off to the side and you always say, ‘I wonder where that goes,’ with this vehicle you’d go find out.” Pozzi said the Outback has not been regularly stocked yet due to its cost and the untested nature of the market for expedition vehicles. “Dealers are a little bit leery of it yet,” he said. “That whole field of expedition vehicles is kind of a new thing in RVs.” I guess that means there aren’t as many off-road campers out... Read more



ANGELS IN MEXICO

March 12, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers Our drive down Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula took us along Hwy. 1, a very narrow and winding passage with no room to move off the blacktop.  Through desert and rocky hills, it passes scarce outposts of civilization where few people, if any, speak English. POW! We heard the blowout on a trailer tire.  I looked to the right and realized we were 10 feet from a Pemex gas station, the Mexican-owned system of fueling stops with mini-markets.  I pulled in just POW! enough to get us out of the road.  Ten minutes later the “Green Angels” arrived to change my tire. The Green Angels is a posse of government-sponsored multi-talented people, ready to help and protect tourists plying the remote spaces of Mexico.  Fantasy RV Tours, with whom we were traveling, had hired them to escort our RV caravan for the entire trip, and, I assure you, no members of our troupe were as thankful to Our heroes -- Tony & Isaiah have them along as Monique and I. I have often written and spoken about how RV caravans are not journeys where rigs all travel in a queue.  That’s obviously not always true, because on our 1,200-mile round-trip, our 14 rigs mostly stayed together, almost always in sight of the rig in front of us.  It’s not a command, but it seemed like the best way to travel these precarious roads. When one travel trailer in our band tried to leave room for a motorhome to exit first from a resort RV park, the truck... Read more



Isn’t it time to work less and RV more?

January 11, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

By Bob Difley Productivity. Connectivity. Accumulating Wealth. These are considered positive attributes and goals for working Americans to strive for. Yet “Ecologists warn that economic growth is strangling the natural systems on which life depends,” writes Carolyn Lochhead in the San Francisco Chronicle. You read everyday that we are running out of – or eventually will run out of – many of our natural resources, for example lithium that powers most of our devices, or we will hve to ration some resources, like water that comes from diminishing aquifers and – at least in California – decreased rainfall threatening devastating droughts and wildfires. “As the world economy grows relentlessly,” Lochhead continues, “ecologists warn that nature’s ability to absorb wastes and regenerate natural resources is being exhausted.” And if that isn’t enough to be concerned about, psychologists and health professionals warn that our drive for wealth, continuous connectivity, and relentless need to work more hours, produce more, improve efficiency, and all the other pressures on today’s workforce to be ever more competitive, could have deleterious results on both our mental and physical health. Whether you are a believer or non-believer in global warming, worried about diminishing resources or believing that nature or science will provide, or are a political liberal or conservative, there may be a solution that would... Read more



Heat Your RV with Propane WITHOUT Using Electricity

January 6, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

As winter rolls in, we’re always on the lookout for better ways to keep our RV warm. The Camco Olympian Wave Heater (http://goo.gl/BFO6nc) merits special attention. This is a propane powered radiant heater that’s designed for use inside an RV. Olympian Wave heaters can be wall mounted, or left standing and used as portable space heaters. 3000 BTUs of safe propane powered heat. These heaters are available in 3000 BTU, 6000 BTU, and 8000 BTU variants. This heat output will heat anywhere from 130 to 290 square feet of interior space. Olympian Wave heaters are powered by propane and use no electricity. With an Olympian Wave heater there’s no battery drain whatsoever. (This is a nice contrast to our Airstream heat furnace which drains battery with every use.) Thus, they are ideal for boondocking and dry camping. 3000 BTUs is good. 6000? Twice as good! (Click the pic for more info.) Olympian Wave heaters are silent. There is no fan or blower noise. Due to the double platinum heating element, there is no significant production of carbon monoxide or other harmful waste gases. These heaters radiate heat directly to people and RV interiors without heating the air first, so warmth is felt immediately. Radiant heat is often compared to solar heat, since it’s the same type of heat generated by the sun. The Mac Daddy! 8000 BTUs of warmth. (Click the pic for more info.) They can be used as a primary or secondary heat source. In other words, you could have a second heat... Read more



Boondocking in the Southwestern Deserts

January 4, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

Many RV snowbirds are just now arriving in the Southwestern Deserts, with quite a few heading for Quartzsite, Arizona to “boondock” on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Land. The BLM has established what they call Long Term Visitor Areas (LTVAs) to provide RVers with open space for camping without hookups. The LTVAs are an easy and effective introduction to desert boondocking and snowbirding. Support services and supplies are available, and the great gathering of veteran boondockers, akin to the mountain man rendezvous of 200 years ago, stand ready to help out if needed. However, plenty more snowbird/boondocking possibilities exist outside the LTVAs of Quartzsite in the Mojave Desert of Southeastern California (including some LTVAs in California just west of Yuma) and the Sonora Desert of Southwestern Arizona. After you have tested your desert mettle in an LTVA you might want to try one of these lesser known snowbirding opportunities. You will find the main mid-winter snowbirding locations at the lowest elevations: around Yuma on both sides of the Colorado River, in California west along the Mexican border, up the Colorado River including the Parker Strip and around Lake Havasu, east toward Phoenix and down to Tucson. Low elevation desert camping is also available around Deming in New Mexico. The rest of Mexico is higher elevation, over 2,000 feet, and therefore colder, as are the northern and southeastern parts of Arizona, though many snowbirds gather around Benson... Read more



OUR PERSONAL MESSAGE TO YOU

December 30, 2013 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers This is our 57th posting to RV.net this year – a voluntary, unpaid effort for which our reward has been getting to know you through your comments and crossing paths along the highways and byways of North America.  In the past year, we stopped in 30 states and 4 provinces, each of which has made us richer by allowing us to get to know more people and being able to share our experiences with you. Memories of our Travels in British Columbia It’s tiring to realize that we stopped in 93 different places for at least one night in 2013.  And it’s amazing that since not knowing anything about RVs just eight years ago, we have now rested our rig 476 times in every type of camping spot imaginable.  Ah, the adventures we have had, meaning there are still lots of stories to tell! Getting to know the people of North America: that’s what I always consider the best part of RV traveling.  We appreciate the variety of scenery on our journeys and take great interest in the history of places, both of which continue to earn us the “Never-Bored” label, but it’s mingling with people that really sticks with us. In line with that, I want to add a message of condolence.  We, the readers of RV.net and other blog sites, have lost a friend with James "Butterbean" Carpenter the passing of James “Butterbean” Carpenter, who was a frequent contributor to the comments section.  I have more to say about Butterbean... Read more



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