Top

REVIEW: Merrell “Jungle Mocs” Are Perfect RV Camping Shoes

April 22, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminI recently picked up a third pair of Merrill Jungle Mocs (http://goo.gl/36U3Zn). Although my first two pair are still in great shape – they seem to last forever – I wanted to add a different color. (Insert Imelda Marcos joke here.) These are the best shoes I’ve found for RV camping. How so? Let’s consider some of the unique attributes of RV camping. In a typical day, you go outdoors. You go indoors. You go outdoors. You go indoors. You go outdoors. You go indoors. You go outdoors. You go indoors. You go outdoors. You go indoors. You go outdoors. You go indoors. Get the picture? My wife and I like to remove our shoes when stepping indoors. We aren’t strict about it, but if possible we prefer not to track mud and dirt all over our RV floor. So our preference is for shoes that are easily removable (no laces), comfortable, and versatile. If your shoes have extensive lacing, you’ll spend about five hours a day tying and untying your footwear. Look ma! No hands! (Click the pic for more info.) In ideal weather, my favorite camping shoe... Read more



VIDEO: RV Boondocking & Water

April 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Here’s another episode of “The Loloho Show,” our ongoing chat series that broadcasts to our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH). In this episode, we talk about boondocking and water management. Anyone who RV camps eventually does some boondocking. And why not? Camping without hookups is arguably the most rewarding aspect of RV ownership. Sure, we all enjoy taking a long hot shower in a full hookup campground. But some of our fondest camping memories have been made off the beaten path. In the video we mention several products that have helped us stretch out our water supply. These include: RV WATER FILTER (http://goo.gl/Qlwy2m) The 2-pack is by far the best deal. JERRYCAN FOR WATER (http://goo.gl/g1u4Ok) DRY SHAMPOO (http://goo.gl/2OxQS0) OXYGENICS SHOWER HEAD (http://goo.gl/Q57ekh) BRITTA BELLA WATER PITCHER (http://goo.gl/bJRKrJ) THE NEXT EXIT – INTERSTATE HIGHWAY EXIT DIRECTORY (http://goo.gl/bdUsGy) And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more fun free videos.  Read More →



REVIEW: Chamberlain’s Leather Milk

April 15, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Today we’re taking a look at Chamberlain’s Leather Milk (http://goo.gl/2neqnh), a unique leather cleaning and conditioning product that’s a perennial bestseller. If you have leather seats or other leather products in your RV, it’s worth a look. This Chamberlain’s product is touted as “Leather Care Liniment No. 1.” It’s interesting that the company is labeling this product a liniment, since that sounds like something with medicinal value. Is this a magic leather elixir? Indeed, Chamberlain’s Leather Milk promises to do it all. It’s a combination of natural conditioners plus a gentle cleaner. So unlike Lexol, which offers separate cleaning and conditioning products, with Chamberlain’s you can let one product do the work. The gentle nature of the cleaning means the “milk” may be used as often as desired to clean and refresh leather items. It also means that for extra heavy cleaning jobs, you’ll likely want a more robust cleaner. My personal interest is in keeping our tow vehicle SEEMORE’s leather seats well conditioned and looking their best. But Chamberlain’s claims to be effective on all sorts of leather products, including bags, luggage, purses, shoes, boots, saddle/tack, and leather apparel. Just don’t use it on soft leather and suede and you should be fine. Chamberlain’s includes a special applicator pad to ensure you get the best results from the conditioner. The first thing you may notice... Read more



REVIEW: “Cut Resistant” Kevlar Gloves

April 14, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

I keep lots of gloves in our RV – so many that my wife thinks I have a glove hoarding problem and/or fetish. But each pair really does serve a unique purpose. An example is these G&F Kevlar Cut Resistant Gloves (http://goo.gl/SKBvMY) which are designed to protect hands from cuts and abrasions. These gloves are made of cut resistant Kevlar. (Click the pic for more info.) At first glance, these gloves looks like ordinary cotton gardening gloves. But closer inspection reveals that they are made of cut resistant Kevlar. Note that they are cut resistant, not cut proof. If you really wanted to cut these gloves with a sharp knife, you could probably do so. But it would take some effort. Kevlar offers protection from the sort of small cuts that may happen when handling tools like knives and other blades. Some people use these gloves while working with wood. Others like to wear these gloves in the kitchen when using dangerous tools like a Japanese mandolin. If you want your Kevlar gloves to last, use them for cutting tasks ONLY. Use different gloves for work. (Click the pic for more info.) The goal here is to protect one’s hands from sharp edges of metals, ceramics, glass, and other materials. These particular gloves are studded with PVC dots on both sides that provide excellent grip. Note that over time the PVC dots can get damaged as you handle heavy objects. I have worn these Kevlar gloves while working with a chainsaw and handling wood. I have no illusions that these... Read more



PLEXUS – the Best Plastic Cleaner

March 17, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

From time to time, we spotlight the best garage products on the market. The best plastic cleaner, polisher and protectant we’ve found is Plexus (http://goo.gl/W2C34N). This is the good stuff. Since it’s hard to find in typical retail stores, Plexus remains a bit of a secret amongst the general public. Plexus is simply the best plastic cleaner on the market. (Click the pic for more info.) Plexus has been a longtime favorite of the aviation industry. It was originally created to clean aircraft windshields and painted surfaces. But people soon realized that Plexus works wonders on a variety of plastic surfaces. Plexus has become popular amongst motorcycle and boat owners, who use it to clean everything from helmets to portholes. It certainly works the same magic on RVs. For example, Plexus cleans fiberglass, bug guards, laminates (like Formica), sun visors, and window tint film. It’s just gotta be plastic. Plexus is easy to use and the results can be dramatic. To use Plexus, simply spray and wipe – no buffing, no mess, and no waste. In my experience, one can of Plexus lasts a long time. As for the dramatic results, I’ve seen cloudy soft vinyl turn clear (for example, on automobile convertible top windows). Plexus not only cleans the plastic in question, it seems to have restorative polishing properties. For example, Plexus will work wonders on the clear plastic of our Airstream skylight. Plexus works well with colored plastics, it makes clear plastic... Read more



Boondockers have one rule: There are no rules

March 15, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

By Bob Difley Boondockers unwritten rules If you don’t boondock, you might think that when you are truly boondocking–camping out away from any hook-ups or other amenities, not in a campground, and on free public lands–you also don’t have any rules to follow. Not so–though there are those who do not follow the rules and that hurts the rest of us. The rules are loosely defined, aren’t hard to follow or unusually restrictive, and generally don’t infringe on or detract from the boondocking experience. Pick a campsite away from others. Most boondockers, until otherwise determined, value their solitude and privacy, and prefer not to have neighbors close by. Upon arrival, walk the site with a bag and pick up any man-made trash left behind by previous campers. Just do it and don’t fret about it. It won’t take you long If you build a campfire, anything that will not burn to ashes, carry it out. Find ways to hang things other than driving nails into trees. Keep your campsite neat. Put things away when not in use. Nobody wants to see all your stuff scattered about like a yard sale in progress. Pick up only downed and dead wood for a campfire. Chopping limbs off trees or uprooting bushes to burn is something only clueless teenagers would do. Think safety when building a campfire. Scrape all debris several feet away from your fire and keep your fire small. Build a rock ring or dig a depression to contain the fire. If you dump the gray... Read more



ANGELS IN MEXICO

March 12, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers Our drive down Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula took us along Hwy. 1, a very narrow and winding passage with no room to move off the blacktop.  Through desert and rocky hills, it passes scarce outposts of civilization where few people, if any, speak English. POW! We heard the blowout on a trailer tire.  I looked to the right and realized we were 10 feet from a Pemex gas station, the Mexican-owned system of fueling stops with mini-markets.  I pulled in just POW! enough to get us out of the road.  Ten minutes later the “Green Angels” arrived to change my tire. The Green Angels is a posse of government-sponsored multi-talented people, ready to help and protect tourists plying the remote spaces of Mexico.  Fantasy RV Tours, with whom we were traveling, had hired them to escort our RV caravan for the entire trip, and, I assure you, no members of our troupe were as thankful to Our heroes -- Tony & Isaiah have them along as Monique and I. I have often written and spoken about how RV caravans are not journeys where rigs all travel in a queue.  That’s obviously not always true, because on our 1,200-mile round-trip, our 14 rigs mostly stayed together, almost always in sight of the rig in front of us.  It’s not a command, but it seemed like the best way to travel these precarious roads. When one travel trailer in our band tried to leave room for a motorhome to exit first from a resort RV park, the truck... Read more



Did you make it to Quartzsite this winter?

March 6, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

By Bob Difley If you haven’t been to Quartzsite yet, you’ve missed it for the season. It’s starting to get hot – it’s already passing 80 degrees everyday and will move progressively warmer – and snowbirds are leaving in droves. But never fear, it will still be there next year, and if you’ve thought about going but just haven’t made the move yet, read the article below by Melanie Cullen of Blue Sky Energy and you’ll get a better idea of what the Quartzsite experience, especially the RV Show, is all about. Looking Back and Ahead at the Quartzsite RV Show By Melanie Cullen, Blue Sky Energy, Inc. While dry camping last January at the 31st annual Quartzsite RV Show, Rick and I reminisced about how Quartzsite (or Q) has changed over the last 15 years that we’ve been going and what we think the next 15 years might bring. Dry camping or “boondocking” is camping without any hookups or connections to water, power or a sewer. We bring everything we need including water and use solar to charge our RV battery for electricity. Over the years, Q has grown significantly in size from around 60,000 in 1999 to over 150,000 this year, and become more focused on making RV living cozy, which will have a big impact on how RVs are powered in the future. When we first went to the Quartzsite RV Show in ’99, the RV Pavilion was packed with big-ticket items like RV satellites, tow hitches, and companies offering to install a solar array on your... Read more



In a camping rut? Try wildlife refuges

March 1, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

By Bob Difley Are you in a rut? If you’ve been RVing for a couple of year or more you likely have found favorite spots that you return to year after year. But you probably also realize that these are not the only campgrounds that will ever like, so why not venture out into new places, take different routes, or camp in places you wonce wouldn’t have considered? I’ve been guilty of the same complacency at times, but when I changed my habits I found great spots, terrific places to camp, hike, ride my mountain bike, or look for birds and wildlife. It just takes a commitment to once in a while do something, go somewhere different. OK. Once you make that commitment, may I suggest you check out this country’s wildlife refuges. In addition to all the state wildlife areas around the country, the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service manages the world’s premier system of public lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants. Since President Theodore Roosevelt designated Florida’s Pelican Island as the first wildlife refuge in 1903, the System has grown to more than 150 million acres, 551 national wildlife refuges, as well as other units of the Refuge System, plus 37 wetland management districts. That is a heck of a lot of land that belong to each and every one of us – what is designated as public lands – and open for many kinds of recreational pursuits beyond hunting. The guide book to the refuges that I have... Read more



ANSWERING QUESTIONS & COMMENTS FROM YOU

January 12, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers Yesterday I was macerating.  What’s that, you may ask.  Check out my website at http://ontopoftheworld.bz/category/barrys-travel-blog-3/ for a full explanation with photos.  I first learned about it six years ago in Key West but didn’t try it until this week.  Monique are I are in the throes of preparing for 10 days in the high desert of Arizona, where we will witness an expanse of nothingness blossom, beginning with the huge white canvas tent already up and awaiting us and up to a million folks with interests common to yours.  That cavernous tent will contain endless RV-related booths [look for us behind booth No. 401 next to one of the western entrances].  Outside on the perimeter of the tent will be more service and product vendors including gem and mineral sellers, plus a long RV repair garage.  Beyond that is free parking flanked by hundreds of flea-market-type booths. Me leaving the show a couple of years ago -- OVERLOADED! Across Interstate-10 is the desert town of Quartzsite, which, in addition to rock and “collectibles” shops now has fast-food restaurants and cafes, groceries, gas stations and other essential services.  On down the road … or really roads … are private RV parks (we’ve heard differing stories about whether there are spaces available or not) and radiating outward even further are miles of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) scrub lands, where RVers park for free, boondocking... Read more



Next Page »

Bottom