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FOR SPOILED DOGS

October 23, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminMany RV owners are also dog owners. One of the best items we’ve found for small (and we do mean small) dogs is our Alfie Pet Sling Carrier (http://goo.gl/gSWwpn). This is an item especially appreciated by spoiled dogs. Available in blue, pink, and grey, this pet sling carrier is just right for our favorite teacup chihuahua – a 3 ½ pounder we call “Baby Girl.” REAL MEN WEAR PINK DOG SLINGS, but if you prefer they are available in grey and blue too! (CLICK THE PIC for more info.) Yes, Baby Girl is a bit spoiled. Just a bit. Since this sort of review is really all about the dog’s reaction to the product, let’s examine this sling from Baby Girl’s point-of-view. After all, if she didn’t like the sling, it wouldn’t really matter what we think of it. But she does like this sling – she likes it a lot. Baby Girl is a tiny little thing. Although she enjoys sitting on the living room couch, she insists on being placed there by a human being. The leap to or from an average couch or living room chair is just a little too much... Read more



Protect Your Valuable Electronics with an RV Surge Protector

October 22, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Traveling from location to location, RV electrical systems are especially vulnerable to damage. That’s why owning an RV surge protector like the Technology Research Surge Guard makes sense. Naturally, RV surge protectors are available in 30 Amp (http://goo.gl/UkubwF) and 50 amp (http://goo.gl/hmBvXk) flavors. A surge protector is an investment in peace of mind for the RV owner. The threat at hand pertains to voltage. Just what the heck is voltage, and why should we care about it? You might think of voltage as being similar to water pressure. We’ve all experienced differences in water pressure. When water pressure is too high, pipe fittings may burst and leak. When it’s too low, you get a lousy shower (amongst other problems). So you might think of voltage as being like electricity pressure. There is an ideal voltage. The standard voltage in the United States is 120 volts. If everything was perfect, voltage would remain at this constant figure. However, in the real world, voltage tends to vary. Even during normal conditions, it might drop down to 110 volts, or spike up to 126 volts. But the code standard is 120 volts. PROTECT YOUR RV with a surge protector. Here's the Big Boy 50 Amp unit. (CLICK THE PIC for more info.) Most electrical appliances are designed to handle small variances in voltage, say from 105 volts on the low end up to 130 volts on the high end. 125 volts won’t kill your iPad. 115 volts won’t tank your A/C. But problems happen when... Read more



Everyone should take an RV trip at least once in their lifetime

September 23, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

Long ago, back when I had a real job, I had a favorite saying when interacting with potential customers. At some point in the beginning of our conversation, I would say, “Everyone should take an RV trip at least once in their lifetime.” You might expect a statement like that coming from the Regional General Manager of a recreational vehicle (RV) rental and sales company. But I fully and completely believed it. And now – 21 years after retiring and 17 years of traveling and living fulltime in my motorhome – I believe it more than ever. I’ve been RVing for more than 45 years, beginning with renting a Class C motorhome for a one-week vacation to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks with my wife and parents. While operating the RV rental company in Northern California I also managed to slip away for several weekends a year in one of my rentals (one of the best perks of a job I can think of), trying different models and sizes of RVs in the guise of “research.” My wife and I would take off on a Friday afternoon for the redwood country, or up the coast, or into the national forests, or to the Mojave and Sonora deserts. We stayed in a variety campgrounds ranging from fancy RV resorts – with swimming pools, spas, and organized recreational activities – to primitive no-frills forested campsites surrounded by towering evergreens. My agenda: to evaluate how the RV and all its systems worked, comparing livability of small to large-sized... Read more



Monitor Animals (AND PEOPLE!) with Stealthy Scouting Cameras

September 4, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

One of the most interesting camera purchases we’ve made in recent years is our stealth camera. (http://goo.gl/ZcifuD) These cameras are commonly known as hunting cameras, game cameras, trail cameras, and scouting cameras. They are invaluable for taking pictures and video of animals (and sometimes people) on the sly. The Primos Truth Cam 35 is the #1 bestselling scouting camera. (Click the pic for more info.) The typical scouting camera combines a motion sensor, a basic digital camera (often with basic video capabilities), and an infrared flash. The latter feature is important for taking photos and video in the dark, when many animals and criminals like to prowl. What makes these cameras great? You get photos and video that would otherwise be impossible to capture. Animals (and people up to no good) usually have no idea they are being recorded. Most of these cameras record their photos to an ordinary SD card. They are typically designed to run long periods of time on a set of batteries. We use Sanyo Eneloop rechargeable batteries with our unit. Some people report better success with Lithium batteries, but ours works fine with the Eneloop. Since they are designed for the great outdoors, it’s possible to lock most scouting cameras shut. They can be chained to a tree or fence to discourage theft. You can even get camouflage locking systems (like the Master Lock Python series) to handle this task so the whole package seamlessly blends into the environment. Usually scouting... Read more



“What Kind of Gun to Shoot Bears?”

September 3, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

From time to time we receive questions about bears and camping. Often these questions mention firearms. For example, “What kind of gun should I carry into national parks to shoot and kill attacking bears?” For most people, we recommend carrying bear spray (http://goo.gl/Cm07tW) instead of guns to repel aggressive bears. In this article we’ll address why. Let me begin by stating that this question has nothing to do with gun rights. We’re not debating the right to bear arms (or the right to bare arms, or even the right to arm bears). This question is about what tool is most appropriate for the job at hand. In this case, the job is repelling bears. You don’t need a gun to repel a bear. In fact, there is arguably a better alternative. Bear spray repels grizzly bears. It's safer, less hassle, and arguably more effective then relying on a handgun (especially a small caliber handgun). Click the pic for more into. FEAR OF BEARS Many people have an understandable fear of bears, especially those of the grizzly variety. “Death by animal attack” is on every Top 10 Worst Ways to Die list. Indeed it would be a terrible way to go. Bears are powerful animals equipped with knifelike claws and sharp teeth. One swat of a grizzly bear’s paw can easily kill a grown man. It’s even worse when the victim doesn’t die quickly, but rather from an extended mauling. We’ve all heard the horror stories. It seems that once every year, some poor soul gets... Read more



OUTSIDE OUR RV AFTER DARK

July 30, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers It’s dark, very dark.  We’re in a park with very few lights to distract us from appreciating our nighttime surroundings.  We are cradled in silence.  This is what nature camping is all about. But wait!  As we lay back in our outdoor recliners, letting go of all the cares of the day just passed, we see lights.  We hear sounds. Tiny lights are overhead, thousands of them, maybe millions, maybe billions, but who’s counting?  We pick out a series of stars that we recognized from National Park ranger talks as being constellations.  We never could envision all the mythical arrangements seen by Romans and Greeks thousands of years ago, but we know the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. Like an exercise in finding familiar figures in the clouds or focusing on the spaces between clusters of leaves, we don’t concentrate for very long on the arrangements we know but rather on the twinkling and steady shining specks across the panoply of sky.  Thankfully, our moon is nowhere in sight. And speaking of clouds, there’s that wispy area – not clouds, but the billions of stars visible in the Milky Way.  That bright unsteady glow in the east is Venus; the faint orange dot is Mars. Red flashing dots blink far away.  An airplane taking businessmen to tomorrow morning’s meetings.  Grandma en route to her annual visit with the kids.  College students off to see friends or to lounge on blistering sand beaches.  We’re... Read more



“How to Buy an Airstream” eBook ON SALE THIS WEEK!

July 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

If you’re interested in buying an Airstream, or even another brand or style of RV, check out the #1 bestselling “How to Buy an Airstream” ebook (http://goo.gl/uV1gtJ) which is ON SALE this week as an Amazon Kindle Countdown deal. The initial sale price is only 99 cents! As the week progresses, the price will edge upwards, so it’s best to act now. ON SALE THIS WEEK! (Click the pic for more info.) The #1 Guide For Airstream Shoppers The iconic Airstream trailer is a legend amongst seasoned RV travelers. After more than 80 years of production, the classic aluminum skinned pods are found in highways and campgrounds throughout North America. Today Airstreams are more popular than ever, but finding the right one isn’t an easy task. Supply is surprisingly scarce. Independent, Objective, & Opinionated It’s crucial that buyers – especially first time Airstream owners – proceed with caution when leaping into this lifestyle. A mistake in this transaction could cost thousands of dollars in unforeseen repair bills, not to mention much emotional grief along the way. Topics include: How and where to find Airstream bargains How to negotiate with dealers How to win eBay auctions The truth about vintage Airstream prices Airstream inspection tips Advice on tow vehicles Again, the Kindle Countdown sale runs this week only. If you want this book at a bargain price, click here to get your copy!  Read More →



Getting away from it all: Boondocking tips

June 13, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

By Bob Difley Do you always choose a campground because of the availability of hook-ups? If so, you may be missing some of the pleasures of camping and the RV lifestyle experience; enjoyment of nature in the wild, wide open spaces, primitive areas, leaving the crowds behind, quiet, solitude, and no neighbors that are so close that you can hear them sneeze. In dispersed camping areas with undesignated campsites or on open BLM or Forest Service land, you can get as close to or as far away from the action as you like. In Quartzite, for example, you will find clusters of campers around a single group fire pit as well as loners stretched out across the isolated reaches of the desert floor. I am not denigrating hook-up campgrounds. I frequently use destination campgrounds because of the amenities that are not available in government or primitive campgrounds, such as swimming pools, hot tubs, organized activities, laundry rooms, and a Wifi connection. But if you choose a campground because you feel that you cannot exist without hook-ups, the following tips and suggestions may help in encouraging you to try an occasional boondocking trip on some wide-open land or deep into a national forest. The easiest way to start dry camping is in an organized campground with water (though not available as a hook up at your site) and a dump station. Your continuous length of stay before the necessary battery recharging, dumping, and water tank filling is dependent on your RV’s capacities. The... Read more



Is the end near for free camping and boondocking?

June 5, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

I’ve been RVing for over 45 years. My first RV, if you could call it that, was a panel van with a side sliding door. Nothing was built in and a mattress occupied most of the floor of the van. Camping in California state parks back then – none with hookups – cost $6 and you could camp in the national forests (NF) and on BLM land for free. In fact, you could sleep overnight almost anywhere, as long as you didn’t become a squatter and behaved yourself. Times have changed. Now you can’t find even the most primitive of campsites for $6, and free camping, though still an option, is available only at selected NF and BLM locations – a recent change. The Travel Management Rules (TMR) are being implemented that restrict not only on which roads you are permitted to drive your RV but also where you can camp. These camping areas are call Dispersed Camping Areas and are shown on Motor Vehicle Use Maps for each forest. There is a fine if you are caught camping in a non-approved area. Free use of our public lands (which are owned by all of us as part of our national heritage for recreational purposes among other uses) will now, unfortunately, be restricted. But before you raise your muskets and storm the barricades to “take our country back” I can understand the feeling among many forest service and BLM personnel when you look at the situation from their point of view. Though we might not like to admit it, there are many among us RVers who take... Read more



Sony RX100: The Best Compact Cameras Ever Made

May 12, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

RV travel and photography go hand in hand. For an outstanding travel camera that’s so small it fits in your pocket, consider the Sony RX100 (http://goo.gl/HkYcXg) series. To add pro video features and wifi to transfer photos, go for the “sequel” RX100 Mark 2 (http://goo.gl/sqJ7qM). These are being called the best compact cameras ever made. They are loaded with professional features, the most important of which is a large 1” imaging sensor. The sensor is the heart of the digital camera. The best compact cameras ever made. (Click the pic for more info.) We have an RX100 Mark 2, and feel it works especially well in the context of RV travel. When we travel, we want to capture great photos. Smartphone cameras often leave us unsatisfied, but we don’t always want to lug around a bunch of heavy DSLR equipment. An RX100 gives you an image quality that’s comparable to a DSLR, but in a wonderfully tiny package. The essential upside of this camera is its size – it offers a high quality image, but the camera is small – it’s truly pocketable, although it’s a hunk of well built metal. If you are wanting a pocketable pro cam, this qualifies. It’s ideal for taking on a hike or casual walkabout. Alas, the RX100 Mk2 feels clunky in the pocket. It’s a little heavy because it’s made of solid metal. Build quality is excellent. It’s fatter than a smartphone, but it also delivers a much higher image quality. Most smartphones... Read more



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