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Everyone should take an RV trip at least once in their lifetime

September 23, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminLong ago, back when I had a real job, I had a favorite saying when interacting with potential customers. At some point in the beginning of our conversation, I would say, “Everyone should take an RV trip at least once in their lifetime.” You might expect a statement like that coming from the Regional General Manager of a recreational vehicle (RV) rental and sales company. But I fully and completely believed it. And now – 21 years after retiring and 17 years of traveling and living fulltime in my motorhome – I believe it more than ever. I’ve been RVing for more than 45 years, beginning with renting a Class C motorhome for a one-week vacation to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks with my wife and parents. While operating the RV rental company in Northern California I also managed to slip away for several weekends a year in one of my rentals (one of the best perks of a job I can think of), trying different models and sizes of RVs in the guise of “research.” My wife and I would take off on a Friday afternoon for the redwood... Read more



Add these side trips to your snowbird migration – Part 2

September 20, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

In last week’s post (Part I) I suggested that instead of making a near non-stop head long rush to your winter home in the Southwestern Desert, you instead take some time to visit some short side trips along the way. This week I follow with the next highlight following Wupatki pueblo that I wrote about. Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument From Wupatki, continue on the loop. You will pass Sunset Crater (photos), Lava Flow, and Lenox Crater Trails before arriving at the visitor center, which is two miles before rejoining 89. Lava Flow Trail, a self-guided loop, depicts a variety of volcanic features, while Lenox Crater Trail is a more strenuous climb up the side of a cinder cone, two miles round trip. Sunset volcano erupted in AD 1065 and displays in the visitor center illustrate various volcanic phenomena, such as squeeze ups, where the lava is forced upward through cracks, and hornitos, strange hornlike protuberances. Ranger Stephen Nycz explained some of the geology of the area. “From the visitors building we see the same top layers as in the Grand Canyon–250 million year old rock–before there were dinosaurs, trees, or plants, and before the separation of the continents.” Road pullouts, some with trails, provide access into the strange volcanic landscape. The cinders–rough, black rocks–have a strange feel as you walk across them. This crater is the youngest of the few prehistoric volcanoes in the world that can be accurately dated. After... Read more



Add these side trips to your snowbird migration – Part 1

September 13, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

Snowbirds descending from the Pacific Northwest, the plains states, or the mid-west into southern Arizona for the winter have several routes to choose from, though most often they take the most direct. Typically, my father, the archetypal planner, plotted out the exact mileage and average driving time to haul his trailer from home in Pennsylvania to San Diego, CA , where he spent the winter near my brother and his family. He knew practically to the minute how long it would take him to make the journey, starting each day at a prescribed time and stopping each evening at a pre-determined campground (always a KOA), and conducted the trip as if it were an organized time/distance rally. It drove my mother nuts but it worked for him. I know that there are still some of you out there who travel like that today, admit it. Get to the destination in the most efficient and timely manner! Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead! Maybe this year, rather than choosing the most direct or fastest route, try a different way, with side trips and stopovers on the way. (I can see a cold sweat breaking out on your forehead). So it won’t be too debilitating to your efficiency genes, I’ll suggest an easy alternative to start with. Instead of focusing on your destination of Phoenix and its environs, fix your sites on Flagstaff, only a couple of hours driving time to the north. You will pass through some scenic, high country, pine forests before dropping down to the scrub, juniper, and rabbitbrush... Read more



REVIEW: Nikon MONARCH = Great Binoculars

September 9, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

A few years ago, we decided to upgrade our binoculars from a set of K-Mart Special el cheapos to something better. After a lot of research, we ended up choosing Nikon MONARCH (http://goo.gl/kw7UOr) binoculars. We opted for the 8×42 magnification, but the binoculars are also available in 10×42 and 12×42 flavors. The binoculars may last a lifetime. (Click the pic for more info.) Quality binoculars are a long term investment for anyone who enjoys the great outdoors. We use ours for observing wildlife like birds and bears in national parks. They are also invaluable for viewing boats and (for those of you who enjoy following the latest fashion trends) bikinis at the beach. Of course they are fun at the football stadium as well. Why did we choose Nikon MONARCH? If you know anything about cameras and lenses, you know the name Nikon. The Nikkor company has a long history of lens manufacture. It makes sense to trust Nikon in designing and manufacturing a set of binoculars, since binoculars are essentially a pair of telephoto lenses that are customized for the human eye instead of a camera sensor. When shopping for nice binoculars, you can find the gamut in features and price range. (For example, check out this $6400 pair of military grade night vision goggles – I want some!) We concluded that Nikon MONARCH were the nicest line of binoculars for the money, offering the most “bang for the buck.” Nikon brings all of its lens construction expertise into the binocular... Read more



Monitor Animals (AND PEOPLE!) with Stealthy Scouting Cameras

September 4, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

One of the most interesting camera purchases we’ve made in recent years is our stealth camera. (http://goo.gl/ZcifuD) These cameras are commonly known as hunting cameras, game cameras, trail cameras, and scouting cameras. They are invaluable for taking pictures and video of animals (and sometimes people) on the sly. The Primos Truth Cam 35 is the #1 bestselling scouting camera. (Click the pic for more info.) The typical scouting camera combines a motion sensor, a basic digital camera (often with basic video capabilities), and an infrared flash. The latter feature is important for taking photos and video in the dark, when many animals and criminals like to prowl. What makes these cameras great? You get photos and video that would otherwise be impossible to capture. Animals (and people up to no good) usually have no idea they are being recorded. Most of these cameras record their photos to an ordinary SD card. They are typically designed to run long periods of time on a set of batteries. We use Sanyo Eneloop rechargeable batteries with our unit. Some people report better success with Lithium batteries, but ours works fine with the Eneloop. Since they are designed for the great outdoors, it’s possible to lock most scouting cameras shut. They can be chained to a tree or fence to discourage theft. You can even get camouflage locking systems (like the Master Lock Python series) to handle this task so the whole package seamlessly blends into the environment. Usually scouting... Read more



“What Kind of Gun to Shoot Bears?”

September 3, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

From time to time we receive questions about bears and camping. Often these questions mention firearms. For example, “What kind of gun should I carry into national parks to shoot and kill attacking bears?” For most people, we recommend carrying bear spray (http://goo.gl/Cm07tW) instead of guns to repel aggressive bears. In this article we’ll address why. Let me begin by stating that this question has nothing to do with gun rights. We’re not debating the right to bear arms (or the right to bare arms, or even the right to arm bears). This question is about what tool is most appropriate for the job at hand. In this case, the job is repelling bears. You don’t need a gun to repel a bear. In fact, there is arguably a better alternative. Bear spray repels grizzly bears. It's safer, less hassle, and arguably more effective then relying on a handgun (especially a small caliber handgun). Click the pic for more into. FEAR OF BEARS Many people have an understandable fear of bears, especially those of the grizzly variety. “Death by animal attack” is on every Top 10 Worst Ways to Die list. Indeed it would be a terrible way to go. Bears are powerful animals equipped with knifelike claws and sharp teeth. One swat of a grizzly bear’s paw can easily kill a grown man. It’s even worse when the victim doesn’t die quickly, but rather from an extended mauling. We’ve all heard the horror stories. It seems that once every year, some poor soul gets... Read more



OUTSIDE OUR RV AFTER DARK

July 30, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers It’s dark, very dark.  We’re in a park with very few lights to distract us from appreciating our nighttime surroundings.  We are cradled in silence.  This is what nature camping is all about. But wait!  As we lay back in our outdoor recliners, letting go of all the cares of the day just passed, we see lights.  We hear sounds. Tiny lights are overhead, thousands of them, maybe millions, maybe billions, but who’s counting?  We pick out a series of stars that we recognized from National Park ranger talks as being constellations.  We never could envision all the mythical arrangements seen by Romans and Greeks thousands of years ago, but we know the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. Like an exercise in finding familiar figures in the clouds or focusing on the spaces between clusters of leaves, we don’t concentrate for very long on the arrangements we know but rather on the twinkling and steady shining specks across the panoply of sky.  Thankfully, our moon is nowhere in sight. And speaking of clouds, there’s that wispy area – not clouds, but the billions of stars visible in the Milky Way.  That bright unsteady glow in the east is Venus; the faint orange dot is Mars. Red flashing dots blink far away.  An airplane taking businessmen to tomorrow morning’s meetings.  Grandma en route to her annual visit with the kids.  College students off to see friends or to lounge on blistering sand beaches.  We’re... Read more



“How to Buy an Airstream” eBook ON SALE THIS WEEK!

July 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

If you’re interested in buying an Airstream, or even another brand or style of RV, check out the #1 bestselling “How to Buy an Airstream” ebook (http://goo.gl/uV1gtJ) which is ON SALE this week as an Amazon Kindle Countdown deal. The initial sale price is only 99 cents! As the week progresses, the price will edge upwards, so it’s best to act now. ON SALE THIS WEEK! (Click the pic for more info.) The #1 Guide For Airstream Shoppers The iconic Airstream trailer is a legend amongst seasoned RV travelers. After more than 80 years of production, the classic aluminum skinned pods are found in highways and campgrounds throughout North America. Today Airstreams are more popular than ever, but finding the right one isn’t an easy task. Supply is surprisingly scarce. Independent, Objective, & Opinionated It’s crucial that buyers – especially first time Airstream owners – proceed with caution when leaping into this lifestyle. A mistake in this transaction could cost thousands of dollars in unforeseen repair bills, not to mention much emotional grief along the way. Topics include: How and where to find Airstream bargains How to negotiate with dealers How to win eBay auctions The truth about vintage Airstream prices Airstream inspection tips Advice on tow vehicles Again, the Kindle Countdown sale runs this week only. If you want this book at a bargain price, click here to get your copy!  Read More →



Upgrade Your Rig with a TITAN Large Capacity Fuel Tank

July 11, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

We’ve been pulling together a list of tips for RV travelers who might want to go to Alaska. One of the best involves upgrading to a large capacity fuel tank (http://goo.gl/5hbDkV) by Titan. Install one of these bad boys in your truck and you are pretty much guaranteed to save money. You can almost DOUBLE your fuel capacity with a Titan tank. (Click the pic for more info.) Here’s the deal with a trip to Alaska, or any long trip: you gotta buy fuel. The Titan fuel tank gives you a much larger fuel capacity in your truck. So you can load up on fuel when you find it at cheaper prices. This is crucial for any American who ventures into Canada, where fuel prices can be extremely high. In the Yukon Territory, we have paid $8 a gallon for diesel. Even in more urban areas of Canada, fuel costs are high. You see, Canada offers “free” health care. The way “free” health care works? You pay for it every day, every time you buy any product or service, whether you use said health care or not. “Free” health care is one key reason that Canadian fuel prices are so exorbitant. (To my Canadian friends: please don’t shoot the messenger.) So it makes sense to load up on fuel in the USA before venturing into the Great White North. We met an American traveler in the Yukon territory once who combined a Titan tank with an additional fuel reservoir in the bed of his truck. “I never buy any fuel in Canada,” he told us. “I buy enough in the States to drive through Canada... Read more



How to avoid wasting energy while RV boondocking

July 4, 2014 by Bob Difley · Comments Off 

By Bob Difley When you take the ultimate step and decide to be a serious boondocker, you make  modifications to the way you camp and add certain features like installing a sustainable energy source like solar panels, a wind generator, or a fusion nuclear generator [have they invented those yet?] to your RV that you might be hesitant to invest in until you know you like the lifestyle. How to avoid wasting energy while RV boondocking When you take the ultimate step and decide to be a serious boondocker, you make  modifications to the way you camp and add certain features like installing a sustainable energy source like solar panels, a wind generator, or a fusion nuclear generator [have they invented those yet?]) to your RV that you might be hesitant to invest in until you know you like the lifestyle. But in the meantime, you can follow the tips below to reduce your electrical usage – and the amount of time you need to run your noisy generator to recharge your batteries. Turn off all appliances, lights, radio, TV, and anything else that requires electricity when not in use. Don’t leave your porch light on (a particular annoyance to me when I am not so fortunate to be able to camp away from neighbors, and he/she leaves the light on, ruining my night vision for seeing night critters and star gazing). Coordinate your generator running time with the use of power-hungry appliances. For instance, schedule your showers, water heater, use of microwave, coffee grinder, and dishwashing... Read more



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