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Arizona’s Coconino National Forest: Where Snowbirds head to escape the heat

April 17, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminBy Bob Difley With Snowbird season in its waning moments, RVers are starting to head north to cooler weather, many of which will head for the national forests for a change of scene from the Southwestern Deserts. Many retreating snowbirds, though, choose a more leisurely pace to the northern climes than multiple hundred-mile days of driving, heading for higher elevations and cooler weather in some of the southern parts of the country. Northern Arizona’s Coconino National Forest, for example, lies north of Payson to above Flagstaff and up to Humphreys Peak, the highest point in Arizona at 12,633 feet, about 10 miles north of Flagstaff. There are plentiful areas in the national forest for both boondocking and in forest service campgrounds. However, Coconino is well on the way to fully implementing its Travel Management Plan that designates which forest roads you can drive on and where you can boondock. These dispersed camping areas are identified on free maps available at ranger stations and online. I received the following  email from Mike Dechter, the Litigation... Read more



VIDEO: RV Boondocking & Water

April 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Here’s another episode of “The Loloho Show,” our ongoing chat series that broadcasts to our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH). In this episode, we talk about boondocking and water management. Anyone who RV camps eventually does some boondocking. And why not? Camping without hookups is arguably the most rewarding aspect of RV ownership. Sure, we all enjoy taking a long hot shower in a full hookup campground. But some of our fondest camping memories have been made off the beaten path. In the video we mention several products that have helped us stretch out our water supply. These include: RV WATER FILTER (http://goo.gl/Qlwy2m) The 2-pack is by far the best deal. JERRYCAN FOR WATER (http://goo.gl/g1u4Ok) DRY SHAMPOO (http://goo.gl/2OxQS0) OXYGENICS SHOWER HEAD (http://goo.gl/Q57ekh) BRITTA BELLA WATER PITCHER (http://goo.gl/bJRKrJ) THE NEXT EXIT – INTERSTATE HIGHWAY EXIT DIRECTORY (http://goo.gl/bdUsGy) And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more fun free videos.  Read More →



REVIEW: Chamberlain’s Leather Milk

April 15, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

Today we’re taking a look at Chamberlain’s Leather Milk (http://goo.gl/2neqnh), a unique leather cleaning and conditioning product that’s a perennial bestseller. If you have leather seats or other leather products in your RV, it’s worth a look. This Chamberlain’s product is touted as “Leather Care Liniment No. 1.” It’s interesting that the company is labeling this product a liniment, since that sounds like something with medicinal value. Is this a magic leather elixir? Indeed, Chamberlain’s Leather Milk promises to do it all. It’s a combination of natural conditioners plus a gentle cleaner. So unlike Lexol, which offers separate cleaning and conditioning products, with Chamberlain’s you can let one product do the work. The gentle nature of the cleaning means the “milk” may be used as often as desired to clean and refresh leather items. It also means that for extra heavy cleaning jobs, you’ll likely want a more robust cleaner. My personal interest is in keeping our tow vehicle SEEMORE’s leather seats well conditioned and looking their best. But Chamberlain’s claims to be effective on all sorts of leather products, including bags, luggage, purses, shoes, boots, saddle/tack, and leather apparel. Just don’t use it on soft leather and suede and you should be fine. Chamberlain’s includes a special applicator pad to ensure you get the best results from the conditioner. The first thing you may notice... Read more



REVIEW: “Cut Resistant” Kevlar Gloves

April 14, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

I keep lots of gloves in our RV – so many that my wife thinks I have a glove hoarding problem and/or fetish. But each pair really does serve a unique purpose. An example is these G&F Kevlar Cut Resistant Gloves (http://goo.gl/SKBvMY) which are designed to protect hands from cuts and abrasions. These gloves are made of cut resistant Kevlar. (Click the pic for more info.) At first glance, these gloves looks like ordinary cotton gardening gloves. But closer inspection reveals that they are made of cut resistant Kevlar. Note that they are cut resistant, not cut proof. If you really wanted to cut these gloves with a sharp knife, you could probably do so. But it would take some effort. Kevlar offers protection from the sort of small cuts that may happen when handling tools like knives and other blades. Some people use these gloves while working with wood. Others like to wear these gloves in the kitchen when using dangerous tools like a Japanese mandolin. If you want your Kevlar gloves to last, use them for cutting tasks ONLY. Use different gloves for work. (Click the pic for more info.) The goal here is to protect one’s hands from sharp edges of metals, ceramics, glass, and other materials. These particular gloves are studded with PVC dots on both sides that provide excellent grip. Note that over time the PVC dots can get damaged as you handle heavy objects. I have worn these Kevlar gloves while working with a chainsaw and handling wood. I have no illusions that these... Read more



“Zzz” Better with Memory Foam

April 8, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

One of our all-time favorite RV upgrades is our memory foam mattress topper (http://goo.gl/6qy80E). It transformed our lousy RV mattress into a comfy place to sleep. But if we were shopping today, we might replace the entire mattress with a memory foam RV mattress (http://goo.gl/eSWOC8). For a little more than a mere topper, now you can outfit your rig with a complete mattress. With the RV camping season upon us, this may be the best upgrade you can make. Memory foam is the key to sleep in an RV! (Click the pic for more info.) We spend about one-third of our lives asleep. It’s tough to enjoy a day if you didn’t get quality sleep the night before. Yet most RVs are equipped with thin mattresses that provide minimal back support. In fact, the average RV mattress is scarcely more supportive than a pile of dead leaves. Our Airstream mattress, which is simply an average off-the-rack RV mattress, rests on a hard slab of plywood. It’s kind of like sleeping on a lumpy piece of wood. What do you get when you place a thin lousy mattress on top of a hard surface? You get a backache, that’s what you get. You also get grumpy. You get into arguments. Eventually, you get a divorce. Don’t get a divorce. Get memory foam. Lay a mattress topper on top of an ordinary RV mattress for a vast improvement in sleep! (Click the pic for more info.) What is memory foam? It’s another modern material that’s improving our lives. It’s soft yet firm, offering both... Read more



Bend, Oregon based Host RV introduces off-road expedition vehicle

March 28, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

Bend, Oregon based Host RV introduces off-road expedition vehicle I admit, I’m starry-eyed whenever I come across an expedition or off-road RV, one that will let me explore rough terrain like a super-sized Jeep. And Host’s Outback Explorer has my boondocker’s pulse racing. But Randall Pozzi, national sales manager for the Bend, Ore.-based manufacturer of campers, expedition vehicles and Class C motorhomes, said the products will stand out in the marketplace – especially when it comes to the Aspen. The Outback is all about going places off the beaten path, coming with either three slide-outs and a side entry or two slide-outs with a rear entry. It is built on a Mitsubishi Fuso Canter 4X4 chassis and features a six-speed duonic automatic transmission. “It’s for the people who want to go places you can’t go with your normal RV,” says Randall Pozzi, national sales manager of Host. “It has the ability to cross creeks and go out in the sand. When you’re driving down the highway and you see that dirt road that goes off to the side and you always say, ‘I wonder where that goes,’ with this vehicle you’d go find out.” Pozzi said the Outback has not been regularly stocked yet due to its cost and the untested nature of the market for expedition vehicles. “Dealers are a little bit leery of it yet,” he said. “That whole field of expedition vehicles is kind of a new thing in RVs.” I guess that means there aren’t as many off-road campers out... Read more



BACKING UP, PARK RANGERS AND BAJA

March 19, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers “Hi Barry, is it you who writes the RV blog?” arrived today in my inbox.  That was how Keith, with whom I worked in the ‘70s, contacted me [Believe it or not, there are other Barry Zanders in the world, including one who may have skipped out without paying at a restaurant I frequented with potential clients]. “It is I … with my wife Monique, we are the Never-Bored RVers.” “Fantastic! Yes I’ve read your blogs, and they are very informative. We started RVing two years ago. We bought a Forest River Wildcat and have taken it out the past two summers and plan to do more this year. [My wife and I] usually go out West since my son lives in Lander, WY, and we both love the West.  I [now work part time] for my association and can basically do the work anywhere I can get a WiFi hookup so we should be traveling more. On our bucket list is to visit all the primary National Parks and have been to almost 40 of them. So maybe we’ll meet on the trail somewhere. “We’re headed out in July for a trip up through Wyoming and then down to Lake City, Colorado and Angel Fire, NM.  Are you going to be out that way in July /August?  Do you still have your “bumper-pull”?  I saw the photos of your rig in deep sand in Mexico.” Keith brought up two points that got me thinking.  First, there are 58 U.S. Park Service National Parks.  He mentioned his dissatisfaction with the rangers at one of them.  I... Read more



PLEXUS – the Best Plastic Cleaner

March 17, 2014 by Loloho.com · Leave a Comment 

From time to time, we spotlight the best garage products on the market. The best plastic cleaner, polisher and protectant we’ve found is Plexus (http://goo.gl/W2C34N). This is the good stuff. Since it’s hard to find in typical retail stores, Plexus remains a bit of a secret amongst the general public. Plexus is simply the best plastic cleaner on the market. (Click the pic for more info.) Plexus has been a longtime favorite of the aviation industry. It was originally created to clean aircraft windshields and painted surfaces. But people soon realized that Plexus works wonders on a variety of plastic surfaces. Plexus has become popular amongst motorcycle and boat owners, who use it to clean everything from helmets to portholes. It certainly works the same magic on RVs. For example, Plexus cleans fiberglass, bug guards, laminates (like Formica), sun visors, and window tint film. It’s just gotta be plastic. Plexus is easy to use and the results can be dramatic. To use Plexus, simply spray and wipe – no buffing, no mess, and no waste. In my experience, one can of Plexus lasts a long time. As for the dramatic results, I’ve seen cloudy soft vinyl turn clear (for example, on automobile convertible top windows). Plexus not only cleans the plastic in question, it seems to have restorative polishing properties. For example, Plexus will work wonders on the clear plastic of our Airstream skylight. Plexus works well with colored plastics, it makes clear plastic... Read more



Boondockers have one rule: There are no rules

March 15, 2014 by Bob Difley · Leave a Comment 

By Bob Difley Boondockers unwritten rules If you don’t boondock, you might think that when you are truly boondocking–camping out away from any hook-ups or other amenities, not in a campground, and on free public lands–you also don’t have any rules to follow. Not so–though there are those who do not follow the rules and that hurts the rest of us. The rules are loosely defined, aren’t hard to follow or unusually restrictive, and generally don’t infringe on or detract from the boondocking experience. Pick a campsite away from others. Most boondockers, until otherwise determined, value their solitude and privacy, and prefer not to have neighbors close by. Upon arrival, walk the site with a bag and pick up any man-made trash left behind by previous campers. Just do it and don’t fret about it. It won’t take you long If you build a campfire, anything that will not burn to ashes, carry it out. Find ways to hang things other than driving nails into trees. Keep your campsite neat. Put things away when not in use. Nobody wants to see all your stuff scattered about like a yard sale in progress. Pick up only downed and dead wood for a campfire. Chopping limbs off trees or uprooting bushes to burn is something only clueless teenagers would do. Think safety when building a campfire. Scrape all debris several feet away from your fire and keep your fire small. Build a rock ring or dig a depression to contain the fire. If you dump the gray... Read more



ANGELS IN MEXICO

March 12, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Leave a Comment 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers Our drive down Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula took us along Hwy. 1, a very narrow and winding passage with no room to move off the blacktop.  Through desert and rocky hills, it passes scarce outposts of civilization where few people, if any, speak English. POW! We heard the blowout on a trailer tire.  I looked to the right and realized we were 10 feet from a Pemex gas station, the Mexican-owned system of fueling stops with mini-markets.  I pulled in just POW! enough to get us out of the road.  Ten minutes later the “Green Angels” arrived to change my tire. The Green Angels is a posse of government-sponsored multi-talented people, ready to help and protect tourists plying the remote spaces of Mexico.  Fantasy RV Tours, with whom we were traveling, had hired them to escort our RV caravan for the entire trip, and, I assure you, no members of our troupe were as thankful to Our heroes -- Tony & Isaiah have them along as Monique and I. I have often written and spoken about how RV caravans are not journeys where rigs all travel in a queue.  That’s obviously not always true, because on our 1,200-mile round-trip, our 14 rigs mostly stayed together, almost always in sight of the rig in front of us.  It’s not a command, but it seemed like the best way to travel these precarious roads. When one travel trailer in our band tried to leave room for a motorhome to exit first from a resort RV park, the truck... Read more



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