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WHEN IS A TRAILER AN RV?

November 18, 2013 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminBy Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers I’ve been confused for years by the terminology on two park reservations sites:  Recreation.gov and ReserveAmerica.com.  When asking what type of site I’m looking for, among the choices are “RV” and “Trailer.” We have a trailer, but it’s also an RV; so, which one is the correct selection.  After mentioning this to a friend earlier this week, I decided to get the definitive answer on behalf of all owners of RVs of the various classes.  Here’s what I was told by Vicki, customer service representative for Recreation.gov, ReserveAmerica.com, and ActiveNetwork.com: Dear Mr. Zander, Thank you for using Recreation.gov for your camping needs.   It is my pleasure to assist you today. A “standard site” will accommodate 1 RV/trailer/wheeled camping unit with 1 tent, or if there is not an RV/trailer/wheeled camping unit on the site, it will accommodate up to 2 tents.  An “RV only” site will only accommodate 1 RV/wheeled camping unit (no tents allowed) and “Tent only” will usually... Read more



Why Use Cetane Boost in a Diesel Pickup Truck?

July 30, 2013 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

Why do we use cetane boosting fuel additive (http://goo.gl/v30HmO) in our diesel pickup truck? Last year our diesel truck “SEEMORE” suffered a catastrophic engine failure. Specifically, the EGR cooler failed. We ended up needing to replace both the EGR cooler and the oil cooler with new units. It was quite an ordeal, and not easy on the wallet. As we were leaving the service center, I had an interesting chat with an engine technician. We're now running this diesel fuel supplement in our Ford F250 pickup truck. One 80 oz. container treats about 250 gallons of fuel. If it delivers the claimed fuel economy benefits, the additive pays for itself! (Click the pic for more info.) “What should we do,” I asked, “to help maintain our engine in the future? Are there any products you recommend?” “Get a cetane booster fuel additive,” he replied. “It will really improve the fuel.” He then went on to say some unflattering words about what the government has done to diesel fuel in recent years. So I picked up 80 ounces of this stuff: Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement. This 80 ounce container treats 250 gallons of diesel, so that’s about 10 fill-ups in our truck. It's a sad day when your tow truck gets towed. This is exactly what we're trying to avoid happening again. Will a fuel additive help? It doesn't seem to hurt! (Click the pic for more info.) What are the claimed benefits? It cleans dirty fuel injectors and prevents injector sticking. It boosts... Read more



An RV White Knuckle Experience!

April 15, 2013 by Lug_Nut · Comments Off 

Memories of Lug_Nut. There is an expression in the sailing world that goes like this, ”Hours of boredom interrupted occasionally by minutes of shear terror!” Well, fortunately this does not, or should not, apply to the RV world. The boredom of watching gentle waves going by for hours is probably somewhat understandable. This is not the case of an RV with the constant changing scenery while travelling at nearly ten times the speed of that of a sailboat. The terror referred to may be a sudden squall or unpredicted storm that may render a pleasant sail into a fight for survival. This too is rarely ever applicable to RV travel. I’ve done many motor home miles in every state and province in North America. I’ve done the entire route 1 from Oregon to San Diego pulling a flat tow extended Escalade, somewhere around 68 feet in length. I have encountered severe weather, tough driving conditions and just plain bad conditions. While some of these certainly got my attention, I can’t say they were anything near approaching what one might call terrifying. That all was going to change one day in March of 2013. Alright, now let’s flash forward to that day! We were on route for the northwest and wished to travel California 101, an easy non-event route plan. We approach San Francisco, no problem. We want to cross the Golden Gate Bridge, (Our 6th or 7th time). The GPS, or the actual little green critter that lives within, directed us to head for the Bay Bridge into... Read more



Decreasing The Risk of RV Accidents

March 21, 2013 by Lug_Nut · Comments Off 

A Lug_Nut point of view.   Vehicle accidents are unfortunately all too common, especially minor ones, often referred to as “Fender Benders.”  These types of incidents are both costly and inconvenient, not to mention possibly dangerous.  Many insurance policies provide for a loaner, or rental car, while your vehicle gets repaired.  This certainly eases the inconvenience somewhat, but still disrupts one’s life, albeit briefly. Such a safety net does not exist for most, if not all, RV’s.  If your trailer or motor home is involved in a collision, you will inevitably be without a temporary replacement while it is fixed.   But, unlike an ordinary auto repair, the repairing of these specialized units takes a considerable period of time. Additionally, RV’s are generally larger, and some greatly so, to that of a normal automobile or light truck.  To manage the weight for these oversized vehicles, lighter body materials are often used.  These lighter materials can suffer far worst damage in an impact with an object or another vehicle.   Also, the nature of RV applications may often require maneuvering in close proximity to a host of objects while backing into a relatively small space.  All of these things increase the risks of physical damage to the unit. This can be very stressful if such an event happens just prior to, or while, on your vacation.  It can ruin your plans and spoil your entire holiday.   Unfortunately, there is no guaranteed way of avoiding these... Read more



YOUR STORIES … AND MY ‘WHAT-TO-BUY ADVICE’

February 22, 2013 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers I just read your article about Enon. It gave me a chuckle. I actually live close to Enon and still am not sure where it is.   I hear people talk about it but it remains this mysterious place that only certain people know where it is located. I’ll be following your journey and hope you have a fun and safe trip. Carol Garris In the book “Then There Were None” by Agatha Christy, which was made into a movie in 1959 called, “Ten Little Indians,” the name of the omniscient host was U.N. Owen.  It was later decoded to mean “Unknown.”  Well, maybe the “Mystery of Enon” is that it’s “None” spelled backwards. In response to my request for wrong turn stories, there’s this one from Gary: Perhaps not as good a story as yours, but here goes anyway. My wife and I were traveling south from Mount Vernon, WA, on Interstate 5, talking about anything and everything when we found ourselves on Old Highway 99, the old main north/south Hwy, from Seattle, which is about 10 miles or so to the west, of I-5, without any knowledge of how we got there. We knew where we were, but how we got there remains a mystery even today. That was over 30 years ago and we still refer to that time whenever we find ourselves talking past a turn-off.     Good times.   Yes.  Thanks, Gary AND … We once spontaneously decided to tent camp with canoe, two kids, and a dog. The idea was to get to Flagstaff Lake, put gear and... Read more



Your Next DP May Have Spark Plugs!

December 9, 2012 by Lug_Nut · 5 Comments 

Lug_Nut, with a look at what’s coming.  In the near future your new Cummins powered coach may have spark plugs or like designed igniters.  It will also operate a whole lot cheaper.  It will be like lowering the price of diesel by $1.50 to $2.00 a gallon.  It will not need a DEF system that current produced large diesel engines require.  It sounds too good to be true?  Read on! Cummins Westport has developed and tested a natural gas (CNG) powered engine using the current Cummins series diesel engine line up.   The ISL G, natural gas powered prime mover has been tested and run since 2007 with about 13,000 in operation today.  The ISX 12 G will be marketed to the trucking industry in 2013.  This engine size, the 11.9 liter, is the biggest selling over the road mill.  While both the ISL G and ISX 12 G will be available in North America in 2013, it is not clear if the “B” and “C” series will be. One of the biggest issues currently is the availability of fueling stations throughout the country.  The majority of these are in southern California at this time, but that’s about to ramp up.  Until now, CNG powered vehicles were confined to urban areas where services were readily available. Some big name truck fueling stations, like the Flying J, have already installed the needed equipment and tanks at some locations, with more following. Environmentally, this fuel burns green, with little to no pollutants.  However, there are concerns over the leakage of unburned... Read more



The Weak Link In RV Dash Instrumentation

December 7, 2012 by Lug_Nut · 1 Comment 

A Lug_Nut Thought.  Dash instrumentation has become more and more precise over the years.  Complex informative data can be displayed with near pin point accuracy.  Full “Glass Dashes” like that used in aircraft today are finding their way and showing up on some high end motor coaches.  Digital readouts have become common place in everyday automobiles over the past decade.  Engine temperatures can be observed to the single degree as can speed, engine RPM, manifold pressure, boost pressure, transmission temperature and much more.  In the average vehicle, these multitude of real time data information readings are of little value, outside of a cool looking gimmick.  In most cases “Idiot Lights” would probably suffice.   However, for large vehicles, like heavy motor homes and truck trailer combinations, this information can be vital and of great value.  Observing various data trends and digital readout behavior while travelling, can reveal issues that require attention.  That attention may necessitate an operation strategy change, or, if necessary, a physical investigation. But, there is one instrument that every vehicle has and is used daily.  It has not really evolved operationally over that available when we were born.  While some sensor changes have been made, it is still about as inaccurate as they were 30 years or more ago.  That instrument is the fuel gauge.     Every vehicle I have ever owned, or driven, seemed to have the same inaccurate tendency. ... Read more



An Innovative Idea For RV Transmission Control

November 12, 2012 by Lug_Nut · 16 Comments 

  An innovative product idea from the Lug_Nut file. Automatic transmissions are quickly replacing the mechanically clutched manual gearbox in the world’s high performance automobiles. While many are equipped with single or dual action hydraulic clutches, all are capable of shifting gears automatically. For the positive control of spirited performance shifting, these newer systems employ steering wheel mounted paddle switches. These spring loaded momentary contact levers are located behind the wheel at about nine and three o’clock. They are easily operated with your fingertips while your hands are comfortably gripping the steering wheel. The left one toggles the downshift while the right the upshift. The main transmission control provides a selection of either fully automatic or paddle control shifting. The automatic or manual modes can also be toggled back and forth on some models using just the paddles. Generally the paddle shift feature is not available on the average automobile, other than as a sales gimmick, as it would have little operational value. But what about a large vehicle like a truck or motor home? The ability to manually select the gearing, in this type of unit, is often a need when operating in very hilly or mountainous terrains. Currently, diesel pusher owners control user input shifts by depressing one of two buttons on the Allison keypad. The control keypad is generally located to the driver’s left, often near waist level about equal to the operator’s... Read more



A Popular Choice In RV’s Today

November 3, 2012 by Lug_Nut · 17 Comments 

Lug_Nut, with a product class point of view.  With the economy slowly improving and banks loosening their grip on loans, RV sales are increasing in many areas.  One of the brightest stars in this recovery seems to be the Class B motor home.  These are the smaller, van like, vehicles that are manufactured by such companies as Roadtrek, Pleasure-Way, Thor and Winnebago.  Sales for these types of recreational vehicles soared to a 32% year over year increase during the first eight months of 2012.  The market share certainly belongs to Roadteck, capturing 35.8% of the Class B sales.  They are followed by Pleasure-Way at 19.9%, closely trailed by Thor at 19.3% and Winnebago securing 16%. So, why are these motorized RV’s becoming so popular?  Well let’s look at some of the advantages they may have over that of a Class C or A. Attractive price point ranging from $65K to over $100K for new. Easy to drive and park in urban areas, requiring no special license. Thrifty on fuel and available in gasoline or diesel powered. Can operate as a lone vehicle or a daily driver. Can be stored at home in the driveway in nearly any city. Can travel in locations not accessible to larger rigs.  ie: Going To The Sun Road. Much of the servicing can be done at your local repair shop. Much more energy efficient to maintain interior temperatures in all climates. Okay, but what about the home comforts and conveniences?  Well, no shortage there.  The inside seems surprisingly large given the vehicle’s... Read more



Social Network? Why?

July 27, 2012 by Lug_Nut · 49 Comments 

  Here’s an interesting Lug_Nut thought. Communication is a very important to most, if not all RVer’s  With all the latest wireless technology , internet, smart phones, GPS location devices, etc, I think we are pretty well equipped. After all, we can contact and keep in touch with friends and relatives regardless in the world they, or we, are. Our family and friends network is complete.  Not so, according to the multiple folks that Twitter and Face book off.   What’s up with them?  If they really want to let friends know something, why can’t they e-mail them?   You can do it in a multiple recipient if it is many contacts you would like to advise.  Instead, these lonely folks seem to need to post their life, perhaps in hope that they will be discovered as not a social dweeb! Don’t these people have friends?  Are these people in that need to reinforce their popularity?  Are they insecure with their personal status?  I guess so.  There is no other reason why people would feel obligated to post everything they do, or are going to do, on any public site.  Oh yes, they will tell you it is secure only to those “Friends”, (Many of which they have not seen for years or may be never).  Hello!  Hacking your information is probably “Internet 101, to break into any or all of this gibberish. This social networking is supported by commercial enterprises, and probably for good reasons.  If you owned a business, you would want to reach everyone you can.  Why... Read more



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