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From “Shark Tank”… to your Pickup Truck

November 7, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our E-mail Digest or RSS Feed. We will then send you the stories that are posted each day in an e-mail digest. We use a service called Feedburner for delivery of these emails. You will receive an e-mail from Feedburner after you subscribe and you must click on that email to activate your subscription. Thanks for visiting and enjoy all the information! RV.Net Blog AdminAs RV campers, we’re always on the lookout for interesting gadgets that improve the daily experience with our vehicles. One of the most unique is the Drop Stop (http://goo.gl/2tmcH9), the “original patented car seat gap filler.” Against all odds, this unusual product has become a #1 bestseller in the automotive category. It solves a design problem that we have in all of our vehicles. The package deal includes two Drop Tops and two nice freebies! The Drop Stop is one of those goofy yet brilliant ideas that simply works. The goal of this product is to fill that annoying crack between the center console and car seat, an area the makers of Drop Stop call the “Carmuda Triangle.” (We like a company with a sense of humor.) The Carmuda Triangle is the place where keys, cellphones, spare change, jewelry, makeup, credit cards, bottle caps, pens, gum, and more tend to disappear. Often stuff slips through the cracks and is pretty much gone, sometimes for years, maybe forever. We’ve all dropped valuables into the Carmuda Triangle. Recently we were cleaning... Read more



OUTSIDE OUR RV AFTER DARK

July 30, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers It’s dark, very dark.  We’re in a park with very few lights to distract us from appreciating our nighttime surroundings.  We are cradled in silence.  This is what nature camping is all about. But wait!  As we lay back in our outdoor recliners, letting go of all the cares of the day just passed, we see lights.  We hear sounds. Tiny lights are overhead, thousands of them, maybe millions, maybe billions, but who’s counting?  We pick out a series of stars that we recognized from National Park ranger talks as being constellations.  We never could envision all the mythical arrangements seen by Romans and Greeks thousands of years ago, but we know the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. Like an exercise in finding familiar figures in the clouds or focusing on the spaces between clusters of leaves, we don’t concentrate for very long on the arrangements we know but rather on the twinkling and steady shining specks across the panoply of sky.  Thankfully, our moon is nowhere in sight. And speaking of clouds, there’s that wispy area – not clouds, but the billions of stars visible in the Milky Way.  That bright unsteady glow in the east is Venus; the faint orange dot is Mars. Red flashing dots blink far away.  An airplane taking businessmen to tomorrow morning’s meetings.  Grandma en route to her annual visit with the kids.  College students off to see friends or to lounge on blistering sand beaches.  We’re... Read more



Upgrade Your Rig with a TITAN Large Capacity Fuel Tank

July 11, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

We’ve been pulling together a list of tips for RV travelers who might want to go to Alaska. One of the best involves upgrading to a large capacity fuel tank (http://goo.gl/5hbDkV) by Titan. Install one of these bad boys in your truck and you are pretty much guaranteed to save money. You can almost DOUBLE your fuel capacity with a Titan tank. (Click the pic for more info.) Here’s the deal with a trip to Alaska, or any long trip: you gotta buy fuel. The Titan fuel tank gives you a much larger fuel capacity in your truck. So you can load up on fuel when you find it at cheaper prices. This is crucial for any American who ventures into Canada, where fuel prices can be extremely high. In the Yukon Territory, we have paid $8 a gallon for diesel. Even in more urban areas of Canada, fuel costs are high. You see, Canada offers “free” health care. The way “free” health care works? You pay for it every day, every time you buy any product or service, whether you use said health care or not. “Free” health care is one key reason that Canadian fuel prices are so exorbitant. (To my Canadian friends: please don’t shoot the messenger.) So it makes sense to load up on fuel in the USA before venturing into the Great White North. We met an American traveler in the Yukon territory once who combined a Titan tank with an additional fuel reservoir in the bed of his truck. “I never buy any fuel in Canada,” he told us. “I buy enough in the States to drive through Canada... Read more



Keep Your RV Plumbing Free of Hair & Debris – for Cheap!

June 5, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

If you want to keep hair and other unwanted substances out of your RV plumbing system, pick up some sink strainers (http://goo.gl/Zkg5Ik). These things are cheap and work a treat. Bright colors help the strainers stand out in the sink. (Click the pic to get your own.) Quite simply, the best way to keep your RV plumbing system in good shape is to only put the right things in it. When hair gets through the shower drain into the pipes, it can eventually plug up the works. This creates a mess, and a problem for you to fix. So it’s best to simply prevent the problem from ever happening in the first place. The strainers are available in chrome and multicolored options. The idea is that these strainers are catch-all’s that trap junk while allowing the waste water to flow freely. The bright colors are intended to help prevent the strainers from getting lost in the sink. I like the chrome look as well, but be advised that it is “chromed plastic” and the finish will eventually wear off. The strainers fit one way and can be used in home kitchens and boats as well as RVs. So you might just want to pick up a 10-pack so that all of your drains are covered. This is a simple product that many RV owners are praising. Special thanks to Vinnie Lamica of Vinnie’s Northbay Airstream Repair for bringing this product to our attention.  Read More →



VIDEO: Greasing Your Trailer’s Wheel Bearings

May 14, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

One of the most vital regular trailer maintenance jobs involves wheel bearings. And yes, if you prefer you can buy your own wheel bearing kit (http://goo.gl/F9gGon) and do-it-yourself. If your bearings just need grease instead of replacing, get some Royal Purple bearing grease (http://goo.gl/kbi7sX). Own a trailer? As you prep your rig for summer travel, don’t forget this crucial task. Wheel bearings are a key component of the trailer axle. They are lubricated with grease. It’s absolutely critical that wheel bearings on an Airstream or other travel trailer are inspected and receive fresh grease every 10,000 miles or so. Yes, you can buy a wheel bearing kit and do this job yourself. (Click the pic for more info.) The cost of this maintenance is a couple hours of labor, which usually is around $200-250. No one enjoys shelling out cash for seemingly mundane maintenance items, but it simply must be done. What’s the downside risk to not doing this maintenance? Read more  Read More →



VIDEO: RV Boondocking & Water

April 16, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

Here’s another episode of “The Loloho Show,” our ongoing chat series that broadcasts to our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH). In this episode, we talk about boondocking and water management. Anyone who RV camps eventually does some boondocking. And why not? Camping without hookups is arguably the most rewarding aspect of RV ownership. Sure, we all enjoy taking a long hot shower in a full hookup campground. But some of our fondest camping memories have been made off the beaten path. In the video we mention several products that have helped us stretch out our water supply. These include: RV WATER FILTER (http://goo.gl/Qlwy2m) The 2-pack is by far the best deal. JERRYCAN FOR WATER (http://goo.gl/g1u4Ok) DRY SHAMPOO (http://goo.gl/2OxQS0) OXYGENICS SHOWER HEAD (http://goo.gl/Q57ekh) BRITTA BELLA WATER PITCHER (http://goo.gl/bJRKrJ) THE NEXT EXIT – INTERSTATE HIGHWAY EXIT DIRECTORY (http://goo.gl/bdUsGy) And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more fun free videos.  Read More →



VIDEO: How to TURN OFF the Ford F250 “Autolock” Feature

April 9, 2014 by Loloho.com · Comments Off 

On our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH) we recently demonstrated how to program a spare keyless remote (http://goo.gl/BRQow4) in a Ford F250. This got me thinking about our F250’s autolock feature. CLICK THE PIC TO WATCH THE VIDEO! On paper, autolock is a nice feature – the doors automatically lock once the truck moves faster than 5 MPH. It makes sense in theory. There’s only one problem with autolock: it often succeeds in locking me out of the vehicle. Doh! To be more accurate, autolock succeeds in locking both doors – driver side and passenger side. I can’t count how many times I’ve stopped the truck, gotten outside, and approached the passenger door only to find it locked. Our F250 has no keypad entry on the passenger side; it’s only on the driver side. So if I’m locked out on the passenger side, I must make the long long trek back to the driver side. I know it’s a First World Problem, but it’s a problem nevertheless. The upshot? I’d remove an annoyance from my life if the autolock was disabled. Well guess what? If I’d taken the time to RTFM (”read the Ford manual“) I would’ve found that it’s surprisingly easy to activate and deactivate the autolock feature. So we made a video demonstrating just that. Click the pic to watch the video on YouTube. Also, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel (http://goo.gl/8iyFmH) – over 3 million views and counting!  Read More →



ANGELS IN MEXICO

March 12, 2014 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers Our drive down Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula took us along Hwy. 1, a very narrow and winding passage with no room to move off the blacktop.  Through desert and rocky hills, it passes scarce outposts of civilization where few people, if any, speak English. POW! We heard the blowout on a trailer tire.  I looked to the right and realized we were 10 feet from a Pemex gas station, the Mexican-owned system of fueling stops with mini-markets.  I pulled in just POW! enough to get us out of the road.  Ten minutes later the “Green Angels” arrived to change my tire. The Green Angels is a posse of government-sponsored multi-talented people, ready to help and protect tourists plying the remote spaces of Mexico.  Fantasy RV Tours, with whom we were traveling, had hired them to escort our RV caravan for the entire trip, and, I assure you, no members of our troupe were as thankful to Our heroes -- Tony & Isaiah have them along as Monique and I. I have often written and spoken about how RV caravans are not journeys where rigs all travel in a queue.  That’s obviously not always true, because on our 1,200-mile round-trip, our 14 rigs mostly stayed together, almost always in sight of the rig in front of us.  It’s not a command, but it seemed like the best way to travel these precarious roads. When one travel trailer in our band tried to leave room for a motorhome to exit first from a resort RV park, the truck... Read more



WHEN ISN’T A PULL-BEHIND AN RV?

December 26, 2013 by Barry & Monique Zander · Comments Off 

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers At the end of my previous RV.net posting, I printed a comment from reader Mary Hansen and my response.  Mary wrote: “The description ‘Vicki’ gives doesn’t really clarify (how to make a reservation at Recreation.gov) for me. It’s a very convoluted description. In addition, it didn’t address our situation: we drive a small motorhome (on wheels with cooking and other living accommodations) AND we tow a small car. Is our car a trailer? Which sort of lot would we fit on? Thanks for trying to clarify the situation for us all (love especially your photo mash-up!) but you didn’t include a toad in your pics either!” I sent a follow-up question to Recreation.gov, which resulted in this email [I bold-faced elements in her response]: Dear Barry Zander, Thank you for using Recreation.gov for your camping needs.  It is my pleasure to assist you today. We are sorry for any confusion the website terminology has caused.  

For the purpose of making a federal camping reservation at www.Recreation.gov, an “RV” refers to an all-inclusive wheeled camping unit that may be driven on its own (often known as a “motor home.”)  A “trailer” is referencing a wheeled camping unit that is being pulled or towed by another vehicle.  (Many campgrounds include fifth wheels in the “Trailer” category, because a fifth wheel is not drivable on its own.) 

If... Read more



A Sometimes Overlooked Motor Home Safety Tip

November 30, 2013 by Lug_Nut · Comments Off 

Lug_Nut, with an eye on safety. All motor home owners observe certain procedures prior to taking off from a camp stay. Things like, disconnect all connections, slides in, jacks up, antennas down, and more, are standard rituals they are all accustom to. A vehicle walk around after everything is set, is a good policy and hopefully is done by every RV’er. These often reveal issues that need attention such as open compartments, obstacles beneath the coach or wheels, awnings not locked, etc. A little time spent completing this can save a lot of time and possibly costly repairs later. Okay, all checks out as ready for the road, but, what about loose items within the coach? Those items like toasters, coffee pots, cutlery and other personal things that we all carry, are they safe? They create little or no danger while driving down the road outside of possibly rattling in harmony with the bumps on the road surface. However, in the case of a sudden deceleration caused by a collision or even a panic braking action, these items can become lethal. The sink with several dishes, knives and forks, can be tossed up and become ballistic household shrapnel. Many makes of class “A” RV’s do not fair well in a collision, and in some impact instances, the body may practically disintegrate, offering little or no protection for the occupants. Unlike automobiles, trucks and even buses made today, RV’s do not have to meet the same crash test safety regulations. But, even if they... Read more



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